Remmer de Boer Dr. Med. Vet. MRCVS
Remmer de Boer Dr. Med. Vet. MRCVS

Remmer de Boer qualified from Munich University in Germany in 1996. He gained his Doctorate the following year studying phacoemulsification, the specialised treatment of equine cataracts, before moving into equine practice in his home country.

In 2000, Remmer took the huge step of moving to the UK and setting up practice with a colleague in the beautiful Dorset and Hampshire countryside. Since branching out on his own in 2003, he has built up a loyal following of clients. The business has continued to expand to such an extent that he decided to look for a new business partner and in January 2009, Helen joined Remmer to form deBoer & Taylor Equine Veterinary Surgery.

Remmer enjoys all aspects of equine practice but is particularly interested in reproduction. He is also a member of the Association of British Veterinary Acupuncturists and is able to offer acupuncture alongside more conventional veterinary therapies.

In his spare time, Remmer is learning to sail dinghies and exploring the countryside with his young family.

Helen Taylor MA VetMB CertEP MRCVS
Helen Taylor MA VetMB CertEP MRCVS

Helen Taylor qualified from Cambridge University in 1999 and has been working in equine practice ever since. She moved down to the south coast in 2001, working in two practices covering Hampshire and Dorset.

She gained her Certificate in Equine Practice in 2007 - a qualification (at a level equivalent to a Masters degree) awarded by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons that recognises a depth of professional knowledge in all aspects of equine veterinary medicine.

Since joining Remmer, Helen has thoroughly enjoyed being able to get to know her clients and their horses better and offering a much more personal service. Her interests include internal medicine and lameness investigations as well as looking after the special needs of our oldies!

When not at work, Helen enjoys riding her own horses, Mercy and Mungo, and taking her unruly, young labrador, Mojo, for long walks in the countryside.